About your Search

20120924
20121002
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4 (some duplicates have been removed)
and president obama both expected to speak there shortly. plus the obama administration insists sanctions are working to keep iran's nuclear ambitions in check. others have serious doubts. what happens if the doubters are right? in the race for the white house do the polls paint a fair picture? is there media bias? our "news watch" panel weighs in. all new, all live is "happening now." jon: welcoming jenna lee back from italy. i have hope you had a good --. jenna: our friends maya and pat had an amazing wedding. congratulations to them. back to work today. jon: big day on the campaign trail for the candidates today. we have every angle covered. touchdown tore football fans. i'm jon scott. jenna: i'm jenna lee. first the headline today is that the strike is over. the nfl and the referees union reaching what some are describing as a tentative labor agreement. we'll see if it sticks. this after one of the most tumultuous starts to any starting professional sports season we've seen in recent history. the new agreement puts the pro refs back in their uniforms in time for tonight's game. after
numbers that the fight for president obama and mitt romney remains close days away from the first presidential debate. "wall street journal" marist poll showing the president has a seven point edge in new hampshire and smaller two point lead in north carolina and nevada. that is within the poll's margin of error. meantime new "fox news" polling showing governor romney is losing some ground to president obama among likely voters nationwide. the president, now leading, compared to how things stood before the conventions, when governor romney held a slight edge. joining me now to talk about it with his take, stephen hayes, columnist for "the weekly standard." so since the convention, steven, you know the president has increased his overall lead by five points, yet huge numbers of likely voters, want to show you this, 73%, think that many policies need to change. how is it possible, i mean that's a big number, 73%. how is it possible that an incumbent leads when so many voters want change? >> isn't that an absolutely fascinating result? putting those two poll numbers up against one an
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)